City of Perth Library

City of Perth Library

Project Details

The library green wall consist of a 14 metre tall structure, located on the opposite building to the library. This ensure you the view from the library itself is of a green wall, and not a grey building, allowing natural light and creates a welcoming ambiance.

WSUD Category: Green Roof & Walls

CriteriaInformation
Development Type:Public Open Space
Function/Driver:Environmental improvement
Government Area:City of Perth
Site Context:Well-draining soils
Year Completed:2016

Overview

The library green wall consist of a 14 metre tall structure, located on the opposite building to the library. This ensure you the view from the library itself is of a green wall, and not a grey building, allowing natural light and creates a welcoming ambiance.

How it works
The structure consist of a Fytogreen wall, with panels and a growing medium. Plants are placed directly into the growing medium, and is allowed to grown upwards. Irrigation is in place to ensure the entire wall recieves equal amount of water.

Maintenance
The greenwall is serviced on a fortnightly basis by a specialist greenwall contractor. These works include irrigation testing and repair, monitoring and reporting on soil moisture and nutrient levels, and the removal of weeds and spent foliage up the first two meters of the wall. On a monthly basis the entire wall is inspected and where required plants are pruned to promote growth and allow sunlight to the lower parts of the wall. During November 2018, 300 plants were replaced. This replacement planting has been variable in its success with some specimens performing and others not. Staff from the City’s Parks Unit met with the greenwall contractor on Wednesday 10th July 2019 to discuss the performance of the wall and approved trailing a further range of plant species in an effort to cover the thin sections of the wall.

Issues
Due to the location of the wall, plants have had a hard time establishing. Prevailing cold and high winds, water runoff from the roof structure (constantly wet) and/or extreme hot days are all factors which play into account for plant decline. It is acknowledged that these conditions are similar to predicted weather changes due to future climate changes, and as such the City is continuing to look for ‘hardy’, site specific plants, which can sustain these extreme climatic conditions, and which may prove to be suitable for other applications/sites in the coming years.

Contact Officer:  Karl Kjaerheim

Email: [email protected]